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‘Curious and curiouser!’ Meteorite chunk contains unexpected evidence of presolar grains – Phys.org

‘Curious and curiouser!’ Meteorite chunk contains unexpected evidence of presolar grains – Phys.org

Curious Marie comes from the Allende meteorite, which fell in northern Mexico in February 1969. The white, fuzzy-looking features in this fragment of Allende are  calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions — some of the first solids to condense in the solar system. Credit: The Planetary Society An unusual chunk in a meteorite may contain a surprising bit of…
#EZScience Episode 4: The Path to Mars 2020 – NASA

#EZScience Episode 4: The Path to Mars 2020 – NASA

Published on Jan 28, 2020Let's talk about science! Watch the fourth episode of our #EZScience series to learn about NASA’s upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission by looking back at the Mars Pathfinder mission and Sojourner rover. Discover the innovative elements of Mars 2020 (including a small solar-powered helicopter!) and what we hope to learn about…
Spitzer Space Telescope gazes at old friend the Tarantula Nebula – CNN

Spitzer Space Telescope gazes at old friend the Tarantula Nebula – CNN

(CNN)It's fitting that one of the first targets for NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is also one of its last, as the mission draws to an end this week. The Tarantula Nebula was one of the first things that Spitzer studied in the infrared, and it's returned to g…
The SpaceX Starlink satellite constellation is growing: Here’s how to spot it – CNET

The SpaceX Starlink satellite constellation is growing: Here’s how to spot it – CNET

The SpaceX Starlink train seen over Japan. Screenshot by Eric Mack/CNET Elon Musk and SpaceX hope to launch more than 1,000 of the company's small Starlink broadband satellites this year, including the latest batch of 60, set to blast off this week. The growing constellation has set off a controversy in the astronomy community over…
What’s in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water – Phys.org

What’s in your water? Researchers identify new toxic byproducts of disinfecting drinking water –...

When phenols, compounds that are commonly found in drinking water, mix with chlorine, hundreds of unknown, potentially toxic byproducts are formed. Credit: Marissa Lanterman/Johns Hopkins University Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States' most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his…
NASA’s new spacecraft will travel within 26 MILES of the sun in order to gather data – Daily Mail

NASA’s new spacecraft will travel within 26 MILES of the sun in order to...

NASA has a new mission on the horizon that will snap the first pictures of the sun's north and south poles.In collaboration with the European Space Agency (ESA), the team is launching the Solar Orbiter that will use Venus's and Earth's gravity to swing itself out of the ecliptic plane — the area of space…
The Hottest Known Planet Continuously Melts its Own Atmosphere – ExtremeTech

The Hottest Known Planet Continuously Melts its Own Atmosphere – ExtremeTech

This site may earn affiliate commissions from the links on this page. Terms of use. As we peer out into the universe in search of other worlds, we’ve spotted many gas giants orbiting close to their home stars. These so-called “hot Jupiters” have extreme environments, but the planet KELT-9b is in a class of its…
Bubbling carbon dioxide vent discovered on the seafloor off the Philippines – Livescience.com

Bubbling carbon dioxide vent discovered on the seafloor off the Philippines – Livescience.com

Home News A scientist collects gas samples at the newly discovered Soda Springs in the Philippines. (Image: © University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences) Diving hundreds of feet below the surface of the ocean off the coast of the Philippines, scientists came across a bubbling hotspot of carbon dioxide. And this newly discovered vent…
Planned nuclear storage material could decay faster than expected – Ars Technica

Planned nuclear storage material could decay faster than expected – Ars Technica

Radioactive and reactive — The interface between different materials accelerates chemical breakdown. John Timmer - Jan 28, 2020 12:17 am UTC Enlarge / Waste in a temporary storage facility.A number of countries, including the United States, has been planning for long-term storage of nuclear wastes. While many of these nations plan to keep the waste…
Antarctica’s biggest glacier still losing ice, thinning in a new way – UPI News

Antarctica’s biggest glacier still losing ice, thinning in a new way – UPI News

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